Player Profile: Jacob Eason, QB, Washington by Lee Wakefield

Is there a prospect that had more intrigue surrounding him prior to the season than Washington QB, Jacob Eason?

The Huskies QB had just sat a year out in 2018 due to the NCAA transfer rules after he left Georgia. Eason, a former 5-star recruit who headed back to his home state to kick start his college career and I, for one, was excited to see what the future would hold for a player who was full of potential.

However, the issue at hand was that in the summer of this year, when we were going through our summer scouting routine, the only game tape we had of Jacob Eason was from 2016, when he was playing for Georgia. Operating in an offense that was different to the Jake Fromm Georgia offense that we see today.

We just had to wait and see…

Fast forward to today and Eason is 10 games into his Huskies career and I feel like now, we can at least begin to assess what kind of quarterback we have on our hands and whether it would be wise for Eason to declare for the NFL draft after this season, his Junior season, with another season of eligibility remaining.

Player Profile

Eason is 6’6 and weighs in at 227lbs, per school measurements. These are nice measurables that NFL scouts and front office staff will love, yet I would like to see Eason pack on a little bit of muscle before entering the pros – I feel like he looks sort of lanky and an extra 10 or 12 pounds would help him be more durable at the next level.

Coming out of Lake Stevens High School in Washington, Eason ranked the No. 4 overall prospect in the nation by 247 sports; rated No. 7 overall, as well as the No. 1 quarterback, by Rivals; listed by ESPN as the No. 13 overall prospect nationally.

So he was pretty good. No shock he was highly recruited and went to Georgia then.

Whilst in a Bulldogs uniform, Eason threw 204/370 (55.1%) for 2430 yards, 16 TD’s and 8 INT’s in his Freshman year.

The next season, in 2017, is when Jake Fromm arrived on the scene and assumed the role of starting QB in Athens. Eason only ended up appearing in 3 games and throwing 7 passes.

So far this season, Eason has completed 63.7% of his passes for 2472 yards, 20 touchdowns and 7 interceptions.

So What’s to Like?

So let’s start to dissect Eason then… Well he’s tall, he’s got a strong arm and he’s white, so he’s nailed on to be a first rounder. End of article. Thanks.


I’m joking, of course…Although John Elway is still an NFL General Manager.

Ok so, whilst (spoiler alert) he’s far from a perfect prospect, Eason is a good QB prospect who has good arm strength, which he can use to push the ball to the sidelines without the ball hanging in the air. He can also push the ball downfield when he needs to – This isn’t something we’ve seen a great deal of but there is evidence that he can do this. Here’s one fantastic throw – Strong armed, accurate and pushing the ball to the sideline from the opposite hash mark. Lovely. 


From the game film I’ve seen, Eason works really well off of play action and both offenses he’s worked in have used this trait to good effect to set up deep shots down the field. This example is again from the game against Arizona earlier this season – Eason has standard 5 man protection out of I-formation and finds his man deep.

When it comes to passing the football, I feel like Eason is best over short to intermediate distances and when he can get the ball out of his hand on time and in rhythm – Eason has a short, sharp release which aides him, especially when looking to hit receivers on horizontal routes. I feel like early in his career, he would often put the ball behind receivers running across the field and his ball placement generally was spotty at best. He’s still not got the greatest ball placement, don’t get me wrong. He still has the tendency to miss receivers high to this day, but it’s certainly an area of his game that he has taken strides in whilst on Washington’s scout team in 2018 and this year as the Huskies starter. Here’s a few examples below:

First off, the good stuff  – Eason hits Hunter Bryant in stride and leads his tight end for a 15 yard gain against Oregon.


Unfortunately, here’s an example of Eason missing an open receiver with a high pass from his Georgia days.


And another from more recently, against Oregon on a clutch 4th down play.


When it comes to being pressured, Eason isn’t afraid to hang in the pocket and find a pass knowing that he’s about to get leveled by an oncoming defender. Although that said, Eason has this crazy tendency to roll to his left when he feels pressure – I felt that this was a big enough issue that I will explore this later in the article. Before that, here’s a great example of Eason delivering a great pass in the face of a blitz and getting a whack for his troubles.


However, it must be stated that this isn’t wholly positive – Eason’s completion percentage drops below 40% when he’s under pressure. That’s pretty alarming and it’s lower than every 1st or 2nd round pick from the past three drafts aside from Giant’s QB, Daniel Jones. 

Just before we close out on the good stuff, I will mention that Eason displays sneaky athletic ability for a man his size when he does choose to tuck the ball under his arm and run. He needs to do a better job of protecting himself and the football when a runner but he is brave and has shown the ability to make tough yardage and a first down. Eason is also the master of the QB sneak – from what I’ve seen, the guy is pretty much Tom Brady-automatic from a yard or less.

And The Bad Stuff?

One thing I absolutely need to see from college quarterbacks is accuracy. If you’re not accurate in college, you don’t magically become more accurate when throwing against defenders who are better in coverage and better athletes at the next level – it simply doesn’t work like that.

Eason has improved his accuracy from 55.1% at Georgia in his Freshman season, to a mark of 63.7% (202/317), which is where he stands at the time of writing at Washington, as mentioned previously.

For comparison, Joe Burrow of LSU currently leads FBS quarterbacks with 78.9% (236/299), that mark is frankly outrageous but even an extremely high volume passer (and less talented QB) such as Washington State’s Anthony Gordon is throwing 71% (323/455) and Eason’s percentage is exactly the same as Hawai’i QB, Cole McDonald – someone who came into the season with questions over his own accuracy.

Food for thought.

The issue for Eason seems to be careless ball placement which crops up at times as discussed earlier. The other issue that I feel Eason is only just weeding out is that until recently, he seemed completely incapable of throwing the ball with any touch.


Woah there Jacob, we know you’ve got a strong arm… your receivers are probably better without broken fingers.

And that leads us into our next problem… Eason knows he’s got a pretty strong arm and at times he trusts it way too much.

This throw was super, ill-advised… trying to hit your guy who was in triple coverage against one of the best defensive backfields in college football.

Silly. Justin Blackmon east those up. 

This was the first of two picks that Eason threw in the game against Utah… the other one, Jaylon Johnson returned for a touchdown.


Speaking of throwing into coverage… Well, this is something that Eason seems to have a pretty annoying habit of doing. Is this a case of not having the mental processing skills associated with high level quarterback play? Yes. Could this improve in future? Maybe.

For every throw like this one against Oregon where he lays it in nicely in between zones…


There’s one like the Blackmon interception or one like this, from his Georgia days against TCU


I mean… Come on, it was a good thing he throws this one long.

Let’s get inside the pocket now and see what Eason is like as a pocket operator.

You’ll notice in the clips I’ve used that one thing that you don’t see much of with Jacob Eason is nifty footwork. In fact, you don’t see much footwork inside the pocket at all; no climbing; no sliding to give himself extra time; I just don’t see much movement.

In the modern NFL, you need your QB to be mobile. I’m not talking Lamar Jackson style athletic ability, that’s ancillary and a huge bonus, I’m talking that bare minimum is Brady/Rivers/Brees type little movements to just avoid that defender’s outstretched arm or just moving up in the pocket to allow your tackle to push the edge rusher downfield.

Eason is a statue, a lot of the time – I feel that this is something that comes with games and experience, knowing when to move, knowing the tendencies of you offensive linemen and of the pass rushers who are hunting you.

Obviously this could develop in time, but it’s just a matter of games,yet there’s no guarantee that it’ll click for him and Eason could just be the next (post Superbowl) Joe Flacco instead of the next big thing.

Now let’s dive into Eason biggest pocket habit…

To the Left, To the Left

Jacob always rolls outta the pocket, to the left…

It is startling to see. For a right handed QB to want to escape to the left this badly just doesn’t make sense. In the video below, you’ll see how often this happens, he even throws in a double spin to the left for good measure at one point.

Don’t get me wrong, he does escape pressure to the left at times but as a righty, it doesn’t make sense.

As a right handed QB, if you’re running to the left, it takes longer to turn your body to reset your feet to throw off of your usual base OR you end up throwing across your body – both of which result in your throw being less accurate and both of which are obviously compounded by having to throw under duress whilst on the move. These will be contributing towards the sharp drop in completion percentage when under pressure, which I went over earlier.

It’s something that Washington Head Coach, Chris Peterson addressed after the Utah game, saying, “We’re trying to emphasise him staying in the pocket. It’s your game to step up [in the pocket], not out”.

Here’s a short video on the issue:


Summary

I feel that Eason has a very high ceiling, both from what I’ve seen on tape and the improvements he’s made from 2016 to now and also the physical traits and measurables that he possesses.

However, the mental side of his game, his footwork and his accuracy aren’t what I would want from an NFL quarterback, especially one that I may be drafting in the first round, and these areas need work.

He simply wouldn’t get away with the shoddy ball placement and throwing into coverage nearly as much in the NFL as he does in the Pac-12.

NFL defensive co-ordinators would gameplan for his tendency to move to his left and just to apply pressure on him generally to see if they could exploit his lack of footwork and he would obviously have to avoid bigger and strong defensive players coming for him whilst trying to process the game quicker.

In short, I feel like Eason simply needs more experience. He’s got the talent but with another year of eligibility left, I feel he would be wise to use it and work on the aspects of his game that need some polish.

Jacob Eason turns 22 years old this Sunday, (17/11/19), next season may be the season when he takes the leap. It seems to be the way of things that QB’s hit a golden zone around the age of 22/23. Patrick Mahomes won NFL MVP at 23, Joe Burrow has taken a giant leap this season when he has turned 23 years old, Lamar Jackson (who is 4 weeks younger that Burrow(!!)) is tearing up the NFL at 22 and will be 23 in January.

Could Eason be the next QB to go through this growth spurt at this time? I think it’d be worth trying to find out… It’s an awful lot easier to develop in college than it is in the NFL.

Stay in school Jacob, it may just be on the verge of clicking.

Follow Full 10 Yards College Football on Twitter @Full10YardsCFB

Follow Lee on Twitter @Wakefield90


5 Early Fantasy Sleepers

Written by Lawrence Vos – 27/5/2019

Early non-playing season sleepers

I feel for all the British railway historians and weekend landscape gardeners who will Google this article hoping to find glorious pictures of blocks of abandoned wood they can drool over.

A sleeper for this particular article is defined as a relatively unknown or non-famous NFL player (veteran or rookie) who is projected to far outweigh his previous production, and breakout by exceeding his expected statistics, based on traditionally being a mid-to-late draft pick.

Before we dive into the 2019 fantasy pool Eric ‘The Eel’ Moussambani like, wearing a pair of borrowed swimming trunks, let’s take a look at some of the outstanding 2018 sleepers who were highly unlikely to have been drafted in any fantasy leagues before the end of August last year, but ended up breaking out.

2018 actual sleeper breakouts

QB

Nick Mullens, San Francisco 49ers (2017 Practice Squad)


Mullens came in for C.J Beathard, who himself was subbing for injured starter Jimmy Garoppolo. Mullens ended up starting the entire second half of the season and recorded a respectable 2,277 yards through the air alongside 13 passing touchdowns. Nobody drafted Mullens to their fantasy team for week 1, but by the latter part of the 2018 season he was proving to be a half-decent waiver wire or late bye pickup. Mullens is not someone to draft or roster in 2019, but he gives the 49ers a low cost reliable backup, if he makes the 53-man roster.

RB

James Conner, Pittsburgh Steelers (2017 3rd round pick)

Philip Lindsay, Denver Broncos (2018 Undrafted Free Agent)

Gus Edwards, Baltimore Ravens (2018 Undrafted Free Agent)

Lindsay and Edwards were not drafted but both started for their teams. Edwards played 11 games, including 6 starts, helping to act as a battering ram taking handoffs from silky running quarterback and fellow rookie Lamar Jackson. Edwards ended up as the fifth leading rookie rusher. The person who finished three slots above him for rookie rushing was Philip Lindsay. The former Colorado player not only went over 1,000 yards (1,037) he became the first undrafted offensive rookie to make the Pro Bowl. Not so much a sleeper, more like someone coming out of a coma to run a marathon. James Conner’s story to date is remarkable, having recovered from cancer in 2016, he was somewhat of an afterthought when drafted by the Steelers at pick #105 in 2017, as LeVeon Bell was wowing the planet with his unique ‘delay and dash’ running style. Nobody thought Bell would hold-out the entire 2018 season, but he did and Conner came in to register just under 1,500 all-purpose yards (973 rushing and 493 through the air). Conner started the 2019 Pro-Bowl over Lindsay. 

WR

Tyler Boyd, Cincinnati Bengals (2016 2nd round pick)

Ok this is a bit of an anomaly to the traditional sleeper criteria as Boyd was picked #55 in the 2016 NFL draft. What gives Boyd the title is his progress from 2017 (1 start and 22 catches) to 2018 (14 starts 76 catches). In 2018 Boyd recorded his first 1,000-yard season (1,028) and led the Bengals in targets, catches, yards and touchdowns (7 – tied with John Ross). Boyd benefitted from a major injury to All-Pro wide-out A.J. Green, but circumstance does not generate statistics, effort, consistency and trust from your quarterback does.

TE

Chris Herndon, New York Jets (2018 4th round pick)

Herndon was the sixth tight-end to be drafted last year and as of Week 1 he was the fourth-string behind a rag-tag bunch that included Eric Tomlinson, Neal Stirling and Jordan Leggett, names only their mother loves (or knows about). In a position that is notoriously punishing to first-year players Herndon ended up on the 2018 All-Rookie Team. His 39 catches led all rookie tight-ends and his 502 yards only trailed fellow rookie tight-end Mark Andrews of the Ravens (552). Achieving this with a rookie quarterback was pretty remarkable too, as Herndon ended up the second leading receiver on the team.

Five 2019 offensive sleeper candidates

So where does this lead us to in 2019? Who is sitting there like an about-to-be disturbed roof full of asbestos in a 1960s primary school, ready to join Baker Mayfield’s ‘dangerous club’, in experiencing an external transformation? Here are five offensive sleeper candidates:

QB

Drew Lock, Denver Broncos (2019 2nd round pick)

The Broncos have struggled at quarterback since the retirement of Peyton Manning at the end of 2015. Four passers have started since then, namely Brock Osweiler (4), Paxton Lynch (4),Trevor Simien (24), and Case Keenum (16). None are considered a franchise quarterback, and to top it off John Elway moved for past-his-prime quarterback Joe Flacco in free-agency. Still searching for a future star the Broncos drafted Drew Lock in the second round of this year’s NFL draft. Many draft-nicks had Lock getting selected in the first round, but he fell, and Denver had to move up and trade with the Bengals to acquire his John Hancock. Lock is the current backup on the depth chart, but he could be on the field by Week 6 if Flacco fails to get the Broncos moving smoothly. Lock was a highly productive college quarterback at Missouri throwing for over 12,000 yards and 99 touchdowns in 46 starts. Nobody is drafting Flacco in fantasy, but you may want to consider taking a flier on Lock on your bench.

RB

Ronald Jones III, Tampa Bay Buccaneers (2018 2nd round pick)

To say Ronald Jones’s rookie season was a disaster would be a gross understatement. If his inept performance was caused by injury there would be a valid reason to relax, but Jones participated in 9 games. His one touchdown (in a 26-23 win against the Browns) was a lone highlight. Besides that his 44 rushing yards and 33 receiving yards were barely worth typing in this sentence. Currently listed as number two on the Tampa depth chart, behind Peyton Barber, Jones has the opportunity for a fresh start under new head coach Bruce Arians. The Buccs didn’t draft a running back this year, another good sign for Jones to have some genuine fantasy impact in 2019. He is durable, as indicated by a 591 carry college career at USC, including a 1,550 rushing performance in 2017. Jones can go from zero to hero and with a good start to his season he could end with 1,000 all-purpose yards.

RB

Malcolm Brown, Los Angeles Rams (2015 Undrafted Free Agent)

The dictionary definition of an insurance policy, Brown is crouching in the weeds whilst the news of Todd Gurley’s knee ailments appears to be gaining growing concern by Rams coaches and fans alike. Brown has already been subject to a poaching bid earlier in the year by the Detroit Lions, with the Rams deciding he was too valuable to let go. Brown averaged a respectable 4.9 yards a carry in 2019. He missed the Rams playoff run to the Super Bowl having gone on injured reserve in December. Much like a cockroach after the apocalypse Brown has been on the Rams roster for four seasons now, and is one Gurley injury from one of the biggest opportunities of his career. Much like James Conner in Pittsburgh Brown is in a great positing to have immediate fantasy impact. You only need look at the production of C.J. Anderson as Gurley’s backup in 2018 to see how impactful a back in L.A. can be. Brown has fresh legs and knows the offense inside out. As a #2 he can get 400-500 rushing yards. As a starter he has the capability to go over 1,250 all-purpose yards in 2019.

WR
Demarcus Robinson, Kansas City Chiefs (2016 4th round draft pick)

Former Florida Gator wide-receiver Demarcus Robinson has been like a Velcro-covered ball that has been rolled around some freshly mowed grass, he has the potential to stick and hit the target but hasn’t quite managed to yet. The Chiefs have had Robinson on their roster for three seasons now, but he has only started 13 games (out of 48 he played in) and this has resulted in underwhelming statistical production (43 catches for exactly 500 yards and four scores). Where Robinson elevates his sleeper status over other wide-outs is not just potential, its opportunity. With Tyreek Hill (I shudder even typing his name) facing a major suspension and current #1 WR Sammy Watkins missing 18 games over the last four seasons, Robinson can easily triple or even quadruple his average production over the past two years. Yes the Chiefs drafted Mecole Hardman, but with few exceptions, rookie receivers struggle to have a huge impact. With the NFL MVP Patrick Mahomes throwing to him in 2019 its time for Robinson to step up to the NFL dance floor.

TE

Matt LaCosse, New England Patriots (2015 Undrafted Free Agent)

Up there with Snow White, Rip Van Winkle and Dracula Matt LaCosse is a classic sleeper. Another winner through self-destruction around him by others, not just pure talent, LaCosse is in a pretty perfect place at a pretty perfect time. With perhaps the greatest tight-end in NFL history now retired in New England, and ageless-wonder Ben Watson recently suspended, all the 6ft 6inch man mountain has to do is beat Austin Seferian-Jenkins to the starting spot for Week 1. LaCosse had a mini breakout of his own with the Broncos in 2018, with 24 catches for 250 yards. Prior to that LaCosse generated no impact with the Giants (two-stints), spent six days as a New York Jets player, and was on injured reserve throughout 2016. His three catches prior to 2018 were barely worth a Wikipedia note. LaCosse is the sort or reclamation project that Bill Bellichick will love to get his evil claws right into. Staying on the field both as a starter and part of some two tight-end sets could see LaCosse generate over 50 catches for over 650 yards and 6-8 touchdowns. That would be a viable starting output from someone who will be only slightly rising up fantasy draft boards at the moment.

Pick It Apart; Dwayne Haskins

Pick it Apart!

The Draft is in the books and the dust has settled. But how well did your team do in the first round?

We are taking a look back at every selection in the first round and giving you the lowdown on the pick; Was it a reach? Was it a steal? We’ll tell you and give you the impact for fantasy football….

Pick: #15

Player: Dwayne Haskins

Drafted by:  Washington Redskins

Grade: A

Analysis: Considering the rumours (which I believe were smokescreens from the Redskins fwiw)that the Redskins were looking at trading ahead of the Giants to take Haskins, this is a great value for a team in deep doodoo at the Quarterback position both in terms of quality, cap space and the future.

To not give up any draft capital at all and still come out with the 2nd best QB (arguable as to what the yardstick is though) in this year’s draft is a right result for them.

We’ll get the “open training camp battle” talk all off season and who knows when the Redskins will announce the week 1 starter, but at least Haskins fits the mould, will suit this type of offence and could easily succeed with his skills and attributes in the big boys league.

The Ohio State QB didn’t over exert himself at the combine and why should he considering the overrated QB , sorry, 1st overall pick in this year’s draft only decided to paly football a short while before it (thanks for the honour of gracing us with your presence, moron) but was 3rd in the Heisman Trophy vote, led the nation with 4831 passing yards, 50 TDs (sound familiar?) and 8 INT in his final year and had a decent 70% completion rate.

This is going to be a run first team, make no mistake about it. Look at the depth (?) they have in the backfield. They wont be asking Haskins to great a deal and the Jay Gruden system should be one to suit him. He is a QB with below average mobility, a powerful arm and has good pocket presence so there are enough credentials there to say Haskins will be an OK QB in this league. The weapons around him are questionable but 2 new faces join Haskins from the draft in McLaurin and Butler to join Jordan Reed, Trey Quinn and Josh Doctson. Excuse me one second…. *PUKING NOISES*. It’s hard to say who will be the apple of Haskins’s eye if he starts this season so keep your ears to the ground around training camp.

That being said, the defence should be decent and should carry on from where it left off last season and the offence have opportunities to be successful in terms of gamescripts barring yet another season of an injury list longer than Darren Anderton’s CV. Let’s not forget that the Redskins were in the driving seat for a poor NFC East last year until Alex Smith went down.

For me, I think Case Keenum should start under Center for the Redskins and give Haskins a bit of time to develop and learn though that is a luxury no longer afforded to rookie QBs it seems (see Lamar Jackson and Josh Rosen). But in Haskins, they have a mid tier QB who can do a job, and that;s all he may need to do with this style of offence and the strengths of the team being the running back talent and the defence.

Fantasy Football Impact:

Dwayne Haskins should only be taken as a late round dart at this point in bestball and you’ll get him late in dynasty startups. Due to the QB depth, you wont need to select him in redraft leagues but those living the stream, he will grace your lineups at some point no doubt.

On immediate first looks, he wont have the plethora of weapons that Kyler Murray has and Jay Gruden will employ a ground and pound type of approach for the Redskins, not akin to lots of fantasy points. Unless he pummels one guy with targets that he gets on well with, no WR will be viable options either, even with Jordan Reed playing a full season…*PUKING NOISES*

NFL Draft Fantasy implications + F10Y NEWS!

On Today’s podcast, RIchard King from Rotoballer joins us as we run through some news including Doug Baldwin, Joe Flacco and Cody Kessler.
We take a look at some interesting Fantasy Football implications from the NFL draft including Washington, Baltimore, Arizona.
Simon from the Collapsing Pocket podcast tackles the quiz and in our 4th down we give you the big news about the Full10Yards and announce our competition prize and details on how you can enter to win a Pittsburgh Terrible Towel.
Please RT, Share, like, subscribe the podcast! we truly appreciate all your support and feedback.

Draft Week – Take or Trade part 1

On the first of 2 episodes this week, we break down picks 1-16 looking at every team’s needs and players they could target or if they may perhaps trade back or even trade up!
1st down covers a few interesting snippets from the schedule release including a team playing alternate home and away games for all 16 games this year!
On 2nd down, Charlie from IceTheKickerPodcast joins us and tries to beat Adam Walford’s score of 7 in the Full10Questions.
3rd down is the 1st part of Take or Trade.
Slight delay from intro to my voice. Apologies for that!

Tim’s Mock Draft 1.0

I feel like I have to make a stand against 99% of all the other mock drafts. I am by no means an expert, but I can’t be having Kyler Murray to the Cardinals at #1 overall. More importantly, I hate to see people taking the easy way out for the first 2 picks in the draft.

Going straight in at the deep end with trades too because let’s face it, it is actually quite pointless to do a mock draft with everyone selecting from their current positions. It’s more likely that a Brexit deal gets through parliament than no trades happening in the first round of the 2019 draft.

Here is my uneducated opinion on what the draft can look like outside the narrow-visioned experts.

#1 – *TRADE* – Giants (from Cardinals) – KYLER MURRAY (QB) – Oklahoma

Although I did say that the Murray to Arizona was boring, I didn’t say that I thought both Murray and the Cardinals wouldn’t be at the #1 spot. I think come draft night, the Giants could give up pick 6 and Browns pick (17) from the OBJ trade. Considering 2nd round picks are being discussed at the moment for Rosen, I can’t see the Cardinals pulling the trigger on that one and it pays off as on the eve of the draft, one team comes in with a decent offer to trade back. From the Cardinals point of view, dropping to 6 is a perfect back stop. The only other team I can see doing something similar is the Raiders from the pick 4, but that can be for another time.

#2 – San Francisco – NICK BOSA (EDGE) – Ohio State

Unfortunately, I revert to the general consensus type here. Obvious, yes. One of the best talents in the draft, yes. So why wouldn’t San Francisco take Bosa? If Raiders are to take a QB, they wont need to give up much to move up 2 spots. San Francisco would be very open to offers too I think.

#3 – New York Jets – JOSH ALLEN (EDGE) – Kentucky

Jets need a pass rush and whilst like San Francisco, would like to trade back to make up for last years sacrifice, in this mock I have them taking the SEC Defensive Player of the year in Josh Allen.

#4 – Oakland Raiders – QUINNEN WILLIAMS (DT) – Alabama

Arguably one of the more surer talents in the draft, Oakland begin their Draft war by starting on defence and picking up DT Williams.

#5 – Tampa Bay Buccaneers – DEVIN WHITE (LB) – LSU

After seeing Kwon Alexander head for the exit door, another Louisiana State Linebacker joins the team to help elevate this defence that played under itself last year.

#6 – Arizona Cardinals (from NYG) – JAWAAN TAYLOR (OT) – Florida

Seeing as though the Cardinals made more moves in FA on the defence, I think they’ll use their 1st of 2 1st rounders to patch up the offensive line that gave Rosen absolutely no time at all in 2018.

#7 – *TRADE* – Denver Broncos (from Jaguars) – DREW LOCK (QB) – Missouri

John Elway will get itchy feet as their pick approaches and I can see them giving up 1.10 and 2.09 to move up 3 spots to get another Quarterback.

#8 – Detroit Lions – RASHAAN GARY (DE) – Michigan

Rashaan Gary stays in the state he played for in college. Arguably the rusher in the class with the biggest upside will help cover the void either through injury or otherwise of Ziggy Ansah

#9 – Buffalo Bills – ANDRE DILLARD (OT) – Washington St.

Buffalo still need to repair the holes on the offensive line. Especially more so now that Josh Allen has some people to throw to.

#10 – Jacksonville Jaguars (from Denver) – TJ HOCKENSON (TE) -Iowa

Jacksonville give Nick Foles someone in the mould of Zach Ertz to be a go to guy on the field.

He can also pass block effectively, which will help add to what they tried to implement last year in terms of the running game.

#11 – *TRADE* Miami Dolphins (from Cincinatti Bengals) – DWAYNE HASKINS (QB) – Ohio St.

Bit of a curveball here, with Cincinatti arguably needing a QB trade out of the position and allow Miami to take their quarterback and give up 13, 78 and a 2020 4th Rounder.

#12 – Green Bay Packers – ED OLIVER (DT) – Houston

Green Bay beef up their interior defensive line with the rest of the defence covered by Free agency acquisitions.

#13 – Cincinatti Bengals (from Miami) – JONAH WILLIAMS (G) – Alabama

Zac Taylor will look to tighten up the offensive line to add to the pick of Billy Price last year and fill one of many holes in the roster. Williams can play Tackle or Guard and that versatility is the reason why the Bengals take him.

#14 – Atlanta Falcons – MONTEZ SWEAT (DE) – Mississippi

Atlanta add depth to their roster which was decimated with injury last year. Touted as a top 5 talent before medical history information came to the surface, Atlanta gamble on that not being an issue.

#15 – Washington Redskins – MARQISE BROWN (WR) – Oklahoma

Brown is the first WR off the board and not DK Metcalf. After losing Crowder in FA and only having Doctson, Jordan Reed as their pass catching options, Brown can fill both slot and outside the hash roles.

#16 – Carolina Panthers – CLELIN FERRELL (EDGE) – Clemson

After losing Peppers this offseason, edge rush becomes a top priority and they fill it with the guy from Clemson.

#17 – Arizona Cardinals (from NYG) – DEVIN BUSH (LB) – Michigan

Arizona start to fill out their roster on defence in the draft, getting Bush gives them a good start to that.

#18 – Minnesota Vikings – GARRETT BRADBURY (C) – N.C. State

Minnesota need to protect their $84m guaranteed quarterback. Bradbury can start anywhere on the line and is solid in both run blocking and pass protection.

#19 – Tennessee Titans – NOAH FANT (TE) – Iowa

It doesn’t take too long for the other Iowa Tight End to find a home. Delanie Walker can’t be trusted health wise and Arthur Smith (a former TE coach) goes with a pick on a position he knows very well.

#20 – Pittsburgh Steelers – BYRON MURPHY (CB) – Washington

Arguably the best CB in the class, Murphy bolsters the back end of the Pittsburgh defence after an impressive combine.

#21 – Seattle Seahawks – BRIAN BURNS (EDGE) – Florida St.

Burns brings explosiveness, which is what the Seattle D is all about. Another that had a good combine.

#22 – Baltimore Ravens – DK METCALF (WR) – Mississippi

Baltimore take a flier on a potential big play guy. Yes, this is a run heavy offence in 2019, but that could give Metcalf 1 on 1 looks fairly often. Baltimore aren’t afraid to take WR in the first round with the most recent (failure) being Breshad Perriman

#23 – Houston Texans – GREG LITTLE (T) – Mississippi

Houston could trade back here to accumulate picks, something they’ve not had too many of comparatively to most teams over the last few years. Left Tackle is a gaping hole though and Little plugs in that need.

#24 Oakland Raiders (from Chicago) – DEANDRE BAKER (CB) – Georgia

The Raiders use their second pick of the 1st round to help the back end of the defence who can contribute from day 1.

#25 – Philadelphia Eagles – CODY FORD (G) – Oklahoma

Prior to the Jordan Howard trade, everyone thought that this is where Josh Jacobs ended up.

Very surprised if that is the case now and therefore the Eagles turn their attention to offensive line.

#26 – Indianapolis Colts – DEXTER LAWRENCE (DT) – Clemson

Chris Ballard and Frank Reich have turned everything they touch into gold so far and Lawrence can be a powerhouse up the middle.

#27 Oakland Raiders (from Dallas) – DALTON RISNER (OT) – Kansas St.

It could be easy to put in N’Keal Harry or a WR here as it’s the pick traded to them for Amari Cooper. I think they’ll address offensive line with this pick seeing as though Kolton Miller has struggle thus far. Risner could potentially play both sides of Center.

#28 *TRADE* Washington Redskins (from LA Chargers) – DANIEL JONES (QB) – Duke

Washington give up pick 46, 96 and a 2020 2nd rounder to the Chargers to take Daniel Jones. Whilst they could try and get Rosen for pick 46 in real life, that wouldn’t be happening here with the Cardinals not going for Murray so Washington try and trade up for a QB.

#29 – Kansas City Chiefs – GREEDY WILLIAMS (CB) – LSU

Kansas immediately get a playmaker on defence for a team that have lost a few pieces in free agency including Eric Berry and Justin Houston. They could trade back and get a few more picks to fill all the holes on defence.

#30 – Green Bay (from New Orleans) – AJ BROWN (WR) – MIssissipi

After Randall Cobb left for Dallas, Green Bay uses it’s extra 1st rounder to replace him. AJ Brown could be a great fit for Aaron Rodgers in the slot.

#31 – Los Angeles Rams – CHRISTIAN WILKINS (DT)

Not too many holes to fill for Los Angeles but the void left from Suh can be filled by Wilkins, who is the type Wade Phillips likes: a guy that can get through the gaps.

#32 – New England Patriots – D’ANDRE WALKER (EDGE) – Georgia

New England could do anything from trade out of the first round to either side of the ball. Jachai Polite was another option, but seeing as though Belichick seems to like Georgia, why fix something that isn’t broken?

Where Do They Go From Here; Titans

After our divisional season review podcasts, we are now looking to the future and asking where each franchise goes from here. We put ourselves in the chair of being GM or the owner and going over what moves we would make in order to win a Superbowl, make the playoffs or just regain some pride…

Today we take a look at the Tennessee Titans.

Don’t forget to check out the AFC South podcast where we talked to Adam Foxcroft from the Long Snappers Pod and get their thoughts on them!

How Did Last Season Go?

Last season has to go down as a disappointment considering a new OC in Matt LeFleur was brought in to steer the ship with Mike Vrabel to a new exciting offence, separate from the “exotic smash-mouth” stuff that was rammed down our throats. That said, another winning record and the third straight season of 9 wins (which was good enough for a playoff birth in 2017). The signing of Dion Lewis probably didn’t work out how Tennessee wanted it to and neither did the progression of Marcus Mariota. Mr Wet Wet Wet as we call him on the podcast, had multiple injuries lingering throughout the season, leading to Blaine Gabbert getting some playing time.

It’s fair to say that the defence carried the Titans this season in most games and have the rare accolade of being a team to post a shut out (vs Giants) but also be shut out too (vs Ravens). 3rd best in terms of defensive points allowed and 6th worst in terms of points scored tells it’s own story about the Titans season (shoutout to Kevin Byard for the 66yard special teams trick play touchdown!).

Housekeeping

At the time of the article, the Titans have a healthy $23m in cap space and own the 19th overall pick in the first round of the 2019 Draft (coupled with pick 51 in round 2 and pick 83 in the 3rd).

Outgoings

Some of the time I wonder if Titans HQ is like the film get out where once you’re in, you can’t escape (suitable film title when you think about it).

That’s the short way of putting that nothing is troubling the exit door.

Incomings

The saviour is here! Ryan Tannehill is going to fix all of the problems at QB.

No, but seriously, Tannehill as a backup is not bad insurance for when Mariota struggle with injury again this season. May actually be a smart move if they wish to dump Mariota who is on his final leg of his Rookie contract.

A few signings on both sides of the ball include slot receiver Adam Humphries coming over from Tampa who apparently preferred them to New England despite them offering more money. Rodger Saffold agreed to a 4year, $44m deal to help with the offensive line, one of the best graded units coming in to the 2018 season.

Cameron Wake joins on the defensive side of the ball from Miami with a 3yr $23m deal and a player they’ve managed to keep in free agency saw Kenny Vaccaro re-sign too to the tune of 4yrs $26m (also want to shout out that they have a player called Dee Liner on the defensive line, I kid you not).

Outlook for Next Year

This year hinges all on Marcus Mariota.

Yes he has another new OC to listen to, but this year it’s Arthur Smith. He has already been at the Titans previously as the Tight End’s coach so hopefully the transition will not be as painful as Mariota’s arm injuries suffered in 2018. It’s going to be interesting to hear the vibes coming out of camp about him because whilst he could easily be extended in terms of contract, it’s not too farfetched to imagine a world where Mariota is a free agent in 2020.

The defence is here to stay and should be the main reason why Titans win the games they do in 2019, I am not sure the offence will be able to put them in a position to eke out 1 or 2 more wins that would put them in serious consideration for a division title.

That said, don;’t be surprised if the Titans tinker with the prospect of drafting a WR or even a Tight End to go along with Davis and Humphries to try and ensure opposing defences respect balance on their offence.

Prediction

As said above, whilst the Titans D will put them in consideration as a wildcard team, I’m not sure the offence is going to hold up their end of the bargain.

Henry is in a contract year so it will be interesting to see how much they use him (haven’t we been here before?) and whether they can finally get some consistency going on offence in terms of production and stability at the HC position. Arthur Smith shouldn’t have too many problems implementing what he wants and knows the personnel well so bedding in period shouldn’t cause too much concern for Titans fans.

Surely we couldn’t have another 9-7 season could we?

I reckon we will.

Fantasy Football

Marcus Mariota – No, thank you.

Derrick Henry – RB2 ceiling – 4th rnd pick

Dion Lewis – RB3 – 6th rnd pick

Corey Davis – WR 3 – 5th rnd pick *Potential BUST alert*

Adam Humphries – WR 3 – 7th rnd pick

Delanie Walker – TE1 (aren’t they all!?) – double digit rounds

 

NFC Storylines and LateRoundQBs

In Today’s podcast, we are joined by none other than JJ Zachariason (@lateroundQB) to chat about his podcast and late round QBs but more importantly, whether he would accept work as the first person narrator if they ever brought the TV show “Scrubs” back.

Talking of scrubs, we go through every AFC team and what headlines we will be reading in the offseason and also get JJ to give us a name that will fly under the radar in the upcoming draft.

Put the mockers on it looks at fizzy drinks and Sam from Head On A Swivel podcast tackles the quiz…can they get over the 8 hump?

PLUS info on some things we’ll be freshening up in April!